Arm recovery

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rocky7st
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Nov 12, 2016 8:57 pm

Arm recovery

Postby rocky7st » Sat Nov 12, 2016 9:09 pm

I was reading this article (http://www.usaswimming.org/ViewNewsArti ... &mid=14491) on arm recovery, one of the points they make is:
The recovery should be relaxed. Not a stiff, rigid, mechanical movement. Let the hand and wrist lead the way.


Is that saying the hand and wrist should be leading the arm recovery as I have been taught to ideally have the elbow leading the recovery?
And how much does it matter in the bigger scheme of things?

smootharnie
Posts: 1770
Joined: Sat Sep 22, 2012 11:56 am

Re: Arm recovery

Postby smootharnie » Sun Nov 13, 2016 12:28 am

imagine having a weight on a 2-4 inch rope attached to your pinky.
You have to drop the weight in the water in front of the shoulder, in front of the hand.
Doesnt matter what arm shape¨you use to achieve that. This can be done with a classical high elbow or a straightish recovery.
The weight is pulling on your pinky for the majority of the recovery.
If you make a stabbing movement before entry the hand will hit the water before the weight. Thats the wrong movement.
Maybe the hand can just overtake the weight in a very agressive arm entry, but on average I think the weight will be leading.
just my 2 cts

On a deeper level its not about the arm recovery , but acquiring a relaxation and sense of being suported by the water that allows you to choose any recovery you like.
Ideally you want to achieve the skill level to be comfortable with this drill, than add a recovey thats working well for you on this basis.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9xgkr9nZZmk
Its a tough drill, even the model swimmer breaks her rhythm by taking too much time for breathing now and then, but its the starting point of an optimal stroke in the end.
Once the arms are free and no longer needed for any (often unconscioius) support you are truly free to use them optimally for propulsion purpuses.

this is in theory.
In actual swimming there often is extra support from the underwater arm that is beneficial and working together with the weight of the recovering arm.
They are working together, certainly in a more shoulder driven stroke.
For this kind of stroke the no arm drill is like walking a tightrope without a balancer.
In shoulder based swimming the 2 arms give extra balance leverage like using a long balancer on a tightrope.
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The Dodo
Posts: 111
Joined: Tue May 24, 2016 8:44 am

Re: Arm recovery

Postby The Dodo » Sun Nov 13, 2016 9:19 am

smootharnie wrote:...Once the arms are free and no longer needed for any (often unconscioius) support you are truly free to use them optimally for propulsion purpuses...In actual swimming there often is extra support from the underwater arm that is beneficial and working together with the weight of the recovering arm.
They are working together, certainly in a more shoulder driven stroke.
For this kind of stroke the no arm drill is like walking a tightrope without a balancer.
In shoulder based swimming the 2 arms give extra balance leverage like using a long balancer on a tightrope.


Very perceptive of you "smootharnie"! Maybe that's why I like the "kayaking" or more continuous "wind-milling" arm action - rather than the one most freestylers use of leaving the lead arm outstretched for balance as they inhale. Hence me having the stroking arm into the pull, while the other is at mid-recovery - all due to gently dropping the lead arm's forearm/hand down to an EVF catch - very near the time of the rear arm's start of recovery! The other more important reason for me "wind-milling" the arms - is that I get poor propulsion from the my flutter kicking (my "legs only" efforts just cause me to slowly "dribble" along). Can't afford an otherwise long gap in the arm propulsion, while relying on just the legs to carry me over that pause (while one arm is outstretched for balance - possibly during inhalation - as the other is recovering). Too much slow "catch-up" arm action!


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